Category Archives: Canada

Reviewing 2010 Resolutions

As 2010 comes to a close, it is time to take a look back at the resolutions made for this year and see how I did with my research and then I can decide what my resolutions will be for 2011.

Find out who the parents are of John O’Connell and Bridget (Curran) O’Connell.

For John, I actually found a death certificate. Through the death certificate I was able to have someone find his obituary for me. Read how my Brickwall Came Tumbling Down for more information.

John’s parents are Denis O’Connell and Helen Teahan.

For Bridget, I am still searching for more concrete evidence. At this point, I know she was a sponsor to Catherine (nee’ Curran) Berringer’s daughter. I was hoping to find proof that Bridget and Catherine are sisters, but no such luck. I do have an index from Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland that shows a Bridget Currane was baptized. This index shows parents as Patrick Currane and Mary McGill. According to research being completed on Catherine Curran Berringer, her parents are John Curran and Catherine McCarthy.

So I still have no absolute proof on Bridget’s parents. I have called the town and county where Bridget is buried to see if they have any death records on her, they do not. Our Lady of Mount Carmel has not further information on Bridget or Catherine.

Find out who Marie O’Connell that is buried in St Mary / St Paul’s cemetery is? Does she fit into the family. She is the last O’Connell there.

What I have found so far is that a John O’Connell married a Marie Goyette at St. Paul’s Church on 9 Apr 1915.  John and Marie are found living in Nassau, Rensselaer, NY in 1920 and Fair Haven, Rutland, VT in 1930 (which is where John died in 1931). At this point, I have not found any mention of Marie in the Newspapers, no marriage notice or obituary. I can only assume that the Marie in St. Paul’s cemetery is John’s wife.

Visit the NY Cemeteries were my family members are buried. While in NY, meet the remaining family members that are there.

I completed this journey in June with a cousin and aunt. I have shared some of the photo’s already and have more to share.

Continue research into my Springer line.

The specific records I was looking for on this line were specific to Rose Springer. I was hoping to find her birth, marriage, divorce or even her second marriage records. I have not found one of them so far. To be honest though, I did not search very hard.

What I have been able to find out has come from a phone interview with a cousin in Az who told me that the Springer family is from Quebec and when they moved to the states, they changer their name from Fontaine to Springer. She also told me that Rose’s father died before 1900, he had been struck by lightening (I believe he was going from the house to the barn). I used this information to search ancestry.com message boards and I found another cousin out west. I was able to meet with one of Rose’s nieces over the summer, she took me to a family function where I was able to meet other family members who also remember Rose. It was a great privilege to spend the evening with the extended family.

Find a very nice person who is willing to translate Russian to English for me so I can continue research on my Mother-in-laws family.

Thanks to Thomas MacEntee at Geneabloggers, I found someone who translated a few sections of a Russian website.

My brother-in-law also started helping research this line and we have been able to find the family in ship records (which is what I have been trying to find for about 2 years now).

So, that is my year in review. I hope everyone else has had a good year as well and that you were able to meet some of your goals.

Wordless Wednesday – Niagara Falls

Wordless Wednesday, Ontario Paper Company


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Treasure Chest Thursday – 30 Year Anniversary Letter

The Ontario Paper Co., Limited

Torold, Ontario

From the office of

Arthur A Schmon

President and General Manager

September 3, 1947

Dear O’Connell,

I want to take this opportunity of telling you what a satisfaction it is to me and my associates to note that you have served this Company for thirty years. This, indeed, is a fine record and indicates that you possess those excellent qualities of faithfulness, loyalty and devotion to duty. It is a splendid thing for a man to be able to say that he has been with a company for 25 or 30 years, or more, because it is tangible evidence of a deep rooted attachment between the company and the employee that is mutually desirable and beneficial.

I congratulate you on you long service and wish to convey our appreciation of the fine effort you have made throughout the years. I trust that we will enjoy many more years of service together.

With best wishes for your health and happiness, I remain,

Yours sincerely,

Arthur Schmon

Mr. D. O’Connell

52 Albert Street

Thorold, Ontario

Treasure Chest Thursday – Border Travel Permit

My Great Grandfather, Dennis O’Connell, died in 1950. My father had just turned a year old and probably never met his Grandfather. Dennis moved to Canada in 1917 and continued his life there until his passing in 1950. 

As a resident of Canada, this card gave Dennis permission to travel back to the states, with no more than $5 in US funds, $10 altogether. This card is valid until Jul 8 1944.  According to the Inflation Calculator, that would be like traveling with $62.05 today. Can you imagine traveling with that amount of money today. We would be lucky if it put gas in the and a meal.

As for genealogical information this card does not give many clues. Besides Dennis’ name, it gives us his current address of 52 Albert St., Thorold, Canada. I hope the house is still there. I would like to visit and take a few pictures. 

The back of this card gives the conditions under which the permit mat be used. Unfortunately, it cannot be completely read, it was originally glued into a scrap-book. The black marks on the sides are from the book it was in. You can also see were the paper tore.  At the bottom right hand side, you can see where Dennis signed his name to the document. I get really excited when I see an original signature of my ancestors.

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